August 29, 2012

Bob Lyon to speak on Parlor restoration: Jeff Smith's Parlor restoration part 14

Bob Lyon
National Park Service Historian








ur very special friend, Bob Lyon, will be giving a presentation on Jeff Smith's Parlor in Anchorage, Alaska for the Alaska Professional Communicators if you are in the area. The APC has speakers of interest at their monthly luncheons and Bob's is entitled,“Soapy Smith and the Historic Preservation of his Skagway Saloon.” The event is open to the general public and that's one presentation I would love to hear!


Here is the general information.

Place: Kinley's Restaurant, 3230 New Seward Hwy., Anchorage, Alaska.
Time: September 6, 2012, 11:30 am until 1:00 pm
Cost: $19-$25
Contact person: Barbara Brown
E-mail: akpc@gci.net
Website: http://www.akprocom.org/meetings.php

About Bob Lyon

Bob Lyon started with photography by learning to do wet-plate tintypes, the kind of photography done during the Civil War. He now specializes in large-format photography using a 100-year-old 4²x5² Korona. Much of Bob’s large-format work has been for historic surveys for the National Park Service. His latest project is photographing the preservation efforts of Jeff Smith's Parlor, Soapy Smith’s saloon in Skagway, Alaska. Bob has kindly included us in sharing some of his photographs of the Parlor work. 

Bob has worked in photojournalism—having work published in the Washington Post, Rugby Magazine, Der Speigel, Civilization Magazine, Mother Jones, L’Express, and the International Herald Tribune, among other print media. Much of Bob’s large format work has been for the National Park Service in the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record programs. These photographs are filed at the Library of Congress-‐think of the last scene in the first Indiana Jones movie—except these photographs are available online at www.loc.gov.

His projects have varied from Anasazi ruins in New Mexico to Minuteman III missile complexes in South Dakota. He also visited all 100 Air Force Missile Launch Control Centers in the 1990s to document their artwork. The missile crews painted their underground facilities, rather similar to nose art on bombers in World War II.

From Colorado and a resident of Anchorage for two years, Bob hasn’t produced many local images yet, but he is enthusiastically photographing the Alaska scene. To see some of his work go to: http://www.flickr.com/photos/photo4X5000


















Bob Lyon
Jeff Smith's Parlor restoration

February 4, 2009 (Part 1)
February 19, 2009 (Part 2)  
March 31, 2010 (Part 3)  
August 7, 2010 (Part 4) 
February 11, 2011 (Part 5) 
April 5, 2011 (Part 6)
May 8, 2011 (Part 7)
May 17, 2011 (Part 8)
November 20, 2011 (Part 9)
March 21, 2012 (Part 10)
March 30, 2012 (Part 11)
June 20, 2012 (Part 12)
August 8, 2012 (Part 13)










"I find people putting their money into savings banks. Now, this is dead wrong. The faro bank is the only safe bank. It is run by honorable, high-minded men, who would scorn to do evil."
―Jefferson R. “Soapy” Smith,
Rocky Mountain News, September 25, 1894.



AUGUST 29

1828: The patent for Robert Turner’s self-regulating wagon brake is issued.
1858: Twelve soldiers under Captain G. McLane, joined by 22 Mexicans, battle 300 Navajo warriors near Bear Springs, New Mexico Territory. Ten Indians are reported killed, four wounded, and four captured.
1865: An Arapaho village is destroyed in the Battle of Tongue River, Wyoming Territory.
1879: William Elliott, alias “Colorado Bill,” is hung in Fort Smith, Arkansas. Elliot was wanted in four states for murder. In commenting on Elliott the Elevator noted that "He will hardly be wanted by any other state after they get through with him here."
1885: The first prizefight under the Marquis of Queensberry rules is held in Cincinnati, Ohio. John L. Sullivan defeats Dominick McCaffery in six rounds.
1886: In New York City, Chinese Ambassador, Li Hung-chang's chef invents chop suey.
1892: Billy “Pop” Shriver of the Chicago Cubs catches a ball dropped from the top of the Washington Monument in Washington, DC.
1900: The Wild Bunch outlaw gang robs the Union Pacific's Train Number 3 in Tipton, Wyoming. The bandits take more than $50,000, the largest haul taken by the gang up to that time.






No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you for leaving your comment and/or question on my blog. I always read, and will answer all questions left here. Please know that they are greatly appreciated. -Jeff Smith